Essays on the novel night

Adolescence is a time when teenagers learn to become more independent, become more understanding, and, most importantly, discover themselves and who they are. A Bildungsroman story is that of formation, education, or coming of age. It is characterized by the development of the young protagonist to become a more complete person. The memoir Night by Elie Wiesel features the opposite, an Upon arrival in Auschwitz, Elie Wiesel and his companions are shocked by unspeakable atrocities, and quickly are reduced to instinct. The instincts of self-preservation, of self-defense, of pride, had all deserted But these men do not survive.

Eliezer, a weak boy who has repeatedly risked his own life to help his father, emerges from the death camps to tell his story.

Book Review of “Night” by Elie Wiesel Sample Essay

Love has kept him alive. Night by: Elie Wiesel. Themes Motifs Symbols Key Facts. Important Quotations Explained. Night: Popular pages.


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Take a Study Break. He will be missed. Jul 27, Dennis Littrell rated it it was amazing. A renaissance man in the third millennium I thoroughly enjoyed this, the definitive collection of Gardner's essays, and recommend it highly. Clarke, and Stefan Kanfer. Little more need be said about the value of this splendid book; but I would like to offer some observations. The first chapter, a review A renaissance man in the third millennium I thoroughly enjoyed this, the definitive collection of Gardner's essays, and recommend it highly.

The first chapter, a review of four books on symmetry is easily the most informative and insightful ten pages I have ever read on the subject. Gardner's rare talent for making things clear is shown to such advantage here that I would recommend it as a must read for anyone wanting a career in science writing. It's almost magic, the way he evaporates the fog. The next nine chapters are on the physical sciences including chapters on relativity, quantum mechanics, time, superstrings, cosmology, etc.

The next five are on the social sciences, and it is here that I was introduced to a side of Gardner that I had not found in the other three collections of his that I have read. Chapter 11, "Why I Am Not a Smithian," is on economics and is primarily a dissection of the supply-siders who held forth during the Reagan years. It makes for lively reading even though, curiously it turns into a tribute to Norman Thomas as "the only notable American" to vigorously oppose the Japanese internment camps during WW II. In the next essay, "The Laffer Curve," Gardner continues his assault on the "voodoo economics" of the Reagan years as he presents his own satirical "neo-Laffer curve.

Although here I think he underrated the magic of Spielberg's movie in order to better concentrate on zapping the usual Spielberg schmaltz and pseudoscience. Politically speaking, Gardner reveals himself as a "social democrat. You'll have to read it to see what I mean, but the choices he makes are psychological choices and reveal him as a man who is not afraid to stand by his beliefs. Herein and in the next chapter we encounter the question of whether we can have free will in the view of an omniscient God.

Gardner's solution with C. Lewis and others is to put God outside time and avoid the contradictions. Incidentally, Gardner makes the very salient point that any language that allows sets to be members of themselves or evaluates the truth or falsity of its statements will run into contradictions p.

Writing an Introduction for a Literary Analysis Paper (Night, Wiesel)

It is here in the chapters on philosophy and religion that Gardner is at his most intriguing. He is a theist and a believer in free will, although he admits that "distinguishing free will from determinism" is something we are incapable of doing p. He equates free will with self-awareness and consciousness, and declares p. I agree with Gardner that we are not about to find an answer to the conundrum of free will, although I think it's important to add that as a practical matter the illusion of free will is, for us, as good as the "real" thing.

Readers may be surprised to learn that Gardner also identifies himself as a "fideist," a word I had to look up. It refers to someone who believes in God as a matter of faith. I would like to say since Gardner doesn't that consciousness as self-awareness should be made distinct from consciousness as self-identity. The former is a question of relative complexity, e. The latter is an illusion with great psychological power foisted on us by the evolutionary mechanism primarily to make us fear death. It is adaptive for long-lived creatures such as ourselves, but is otherwise empty.

When the Buddhists and the Vedas and yogic psychology say the ego is an illusion, this is what they are talking about, this delusional self-identity that we sometimes refer to as consciousness. There are number of funny jokes and asides herein. Feb 26, Liedzeit rated it really liked it Shelves: science. A few of these essays are dated, it's 25 years this book came out and it was a retrospective collection then.

But the writing and the spirit are still fresh. This is your best general introduction to this vivacious and charming polymath, since the breadth and depth of his output came close to giving Isaac Asimov a run for his money: Alice In Wonderland, the Twin Paradox, the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle, Allan Bloom, the many Anthropic Principles, H. Wells in Russia, L.

Frank Baum, the interplay between science and pseudoscience, Coler [Forgot to post this earlier] Martin Gardner was large and contained multitudes; here's your proof. Frank Baum, the interplay between science and pseudoscience, Coleridge and the "Ancient Mariner", Joyce and "Ulysses", randomly generated music, computer-aided mathematics research, quantum absurdity, fractals, zero, free will At least from the neck up. The book collects pieces Gardner wrote over many years for a variety of publications, although one of his most consistent projects, the "Mathematical Games" column he wrote for "Scientific American" for many years, is better represented elsewhere see The Colossal Book of Mathematics.

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That's fine, since this compilation is for the sake of variety, and there was plenty of Gardner to go around. Also included here is an infamous hatchet job of several of Gardner's books, written by a certain "George Groth". Shouldn't be hard to figure out who that is. Mar 26, Robert rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: Anyone. Finished the book.

The Night Is Large: Collected Essays, by Martin Gardner

Below is an early entry. More later. This is a very fine book, a cross section of Gardner's writing about scientific, cultural, philosophical and religious topics but very little along the lines of the mathematical games or recreational mathematics that is possibly best known for, there is only one essay in that area concerning Dr. Apollomax, student of Bourbaki that is a hint , that contains a very tricky puzzle and a few apparent paradoxes. In addition, there is one essay t Finished the book.

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In addition, there is one essay that was a negative review of one of his own books under a fake name. Disclaimed at the very end, yet some still did not buy the book because of it. In particular, I liked his essay about the so-called "Anthropic Principle of Cosmology". It is a very sophisticated argument based loosely? It springs from an argument of Bishop Berkeley the great mind that tried to dismiss calculus in its early pre-Cauchy and Weierstrauss form as "the ghosts of departed quantities" who argued that things do not exist without an observer another form of the old joke about the tree falling in the forest making a sound therefore there must be a god to serve as the observer of last resort for everything we can't observe.

The anthropic argument goes further to assert that not only is human consciousness a necessary and inevitable part of the universe but for various reasons the ONLY one having more than us would violate some sort of conservation law. Jun 27, Moshe Zioni rated it it was amazing Shelves: philosophy , mathematics , physics , favorite. Gardner is a skeptic - and he is going the whole nine yards with his scrutinization and objective perspectives on, well, pretty much anything. His wide areas of knowledge are amazing, his research is remarkable and over-all he did a very good job in offering his findings to a layman as myself and still constantly - to be interesting and manages to keep me interested throughout the process - on every topic in the book - Physical science, Mathematics, Social Sciences, Religion, Philosophy, The Art Gardner is a skeptic - and he is going the whole nine yards with his scrutinization and objective perspectives on, well, pretty much anything.

His wide areas of knowledge are amazing, his research is remarkable and over-all he did a very good job in offering his findings to a layman as myself and still constantly - to be interesting and manages to keep me interested throughout the process - on every topic in the book - Physical science, Mathematics, Social Sciences, Religion, Philosophy, The Arts and of course Pseudoscience.